CMOS Bioelectronics

Friday January 20, 2017 at 2:10 p.m. Professor Ken Shepard, Electrical and Biomedical Engineering at Columbia University, will be presenting “CMOS Bioelectronics”.

Speaker: Prof. Ken Shepard
Electrical and Biomedical Engineering
Columbia University

Day & Time: Friday, January 20th, 2017
2:10 pm – 3:00 pm

Location: Room GB 248, 35 St George St, Toronto, ON M5S 1A4

Contact: Junho Jeong

Organizer: IEEE Toronto Photonics Chapter

**Refreshments will be served**

Abstract: CMOS electronics, which has revolutionized communications and computation in the last 30 years, has the same transformative potential for life science applications with appropriate “more than Moore” augmentation. In this talk, we will outline work in my group over the last 10 years, which has applied augmented CMOS to problems in molecular diagnostics, microbiology, and neuroscience. We will discuss several on-going projects in my group in these areas include high-bandwidth CMOS-integrated nanopores, point-functionalized nanotube devices integrated on CMOS for genomic diagnostics, electrochemical imaging chips for understanding microbial communities, high-density electrophysiological arrays for in vivo and in vitro studies of neural systems, biologically powered solid-state electronics, and various wireless probes to studying neural and cellular systems.

Biography: Ken Shepard received the B.S.E. degree from Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, in 1987 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Stanford University, Stanford, CA, in 1988 and 1992, respectively. From 1992 to 1997, he was a Research Staff Member and Manager with the VLSI Design Department, IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY, where he was responsible for the design methodology for IBM’s G4 S/390 microprocessors. Since 1997, he has been with Columbia University, New York, where he is now the Lau Familty Professor of Electrical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering. He also was Chief Technology Officer of CadMOS Design Technology, San Jose, CA, until its acquisition by Cadence Design Systems in 2001. He is current serving on the board of two other start-ups, Ferric, commercializing integrated voltage regulator technology, and Quicksilver, commercializing single-molecule electronic genomic diagnostics. His current research interests include power electronics, carbon-based devices and circuits, and CMOS bioelectronics.