Modeling Semantics of Content on Twitter (What did you mean when you said Yoyo!)

October 22, 2015 at 12:00 p.m. Dr. Ebrahim Bagheri, Associate Professor and the Director for the Laboratory for Systems, Software and Semantics (LS3) at Ryerson University, will be presenting “Modeling Semantics of Content on Twitter (What did you mean when you said Yoyo!)”.

Speaker: Dr. Ebrahim Bagheri
Associate Professor and the Director for the Laboratory for Systems, Software and Semantics (LS3) at Ryerson University.

Day & Time: Thursday, October 22, 2015
12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Location: Kerr Hall West
379 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario
Ryerson University
Room: KHW057
Map – http://www.ryerson.ca/maps – Look for KHW

Organizer: IEEE Systems Chapter – Toronto Section

Contact: E-mail: Alexei Botchkarev

Registration: Registration is free, but space is limited. Please register via this link: http://tinyurl.com/systems-Oct-22

Abstract: The microblogging service, Twitter, has gained wide popularity with over 300M active users and over 500M tweets per day. The unique characteristic of Twitter, only allowing short length messages to be communicated, has brought about interesting changes to how information is expressed and communicated by the users, i.e., the semantics of information when expressed on Twitter differ from when expressed on other medium. For instance, the word ‘metal’ when observed on Twitter carries a different semantic meaning, most likely referring to heavy metal music, as opposed to when used in other contexts where its predominant sense is the metal material. In this talk, I will discuss how the meaning and senses of words can be captured and modeled on Twitter to enable better and more efficient search, retrieval and recommendation of content.

Biography: Ebrahim Bagheri is an Associate Professor and the Director for the Laboratory for Systems, Software and Semantics (LS3) at Ryerson University, and has been active in the areas of the Semantic Web and Software Engineering. He was one of the research theme leaders of the national project on Radiation Emission Monitoring at the National Research Council Canada and was responsible for leading the development of the Semantic Web and Knowledge Engineering components of that project. In 2011, he co-chaired the Canadian Semantic Web Conference in Vancouver, BC (http://ceur-ws.org/Vol-774/). His work on Semantic-Driven Information Extraction has resulted in two provisionally patented technologies namely Denote and Derive. Denote is a semantic annotation platform based on Linked Open Data and Derive is an extensible architecture for unsupervised knowledge extraction and object (concept and property-value pair) population from the Web. He has been involved in projects that encompass the use of Semantic Web technologies in the areas of e-commerce and business process modeling funded by NSERC, AIF and IBM. Over the past 5 years, he has led projects worth over $5M CAD including various NSERC research and development projects with over 12 industrial partners. He is a senior member of IEEE, an IBM Faculty Fellow and a member of PEO.