Mechatronics in Surgery and Rehabilitation

July 06, 2015 at 3:00 p.m. Ana Luisa Trejos, Ph.D., P.Eng., will be presenting “Mechatronics in Surgery and Rehabilitation”.

Speaker: Ana Luisa Trejos, Ph.D., P.Eng.

Day & Time: Monday, July 06, 2015
3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Location: Room ENG 288
Computer Science Department
George Vari Centre for Computing and Engineering
Ryerson University
245 Church St.
Toronto, ON, M5B 2K3

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Organizer: IEEE Magnetics Chapter, IEEE Instrumentation & Measurement Joint Chapter

Contact: Maryam Davoudpour, E-mail: maryam.davoudpour@ieee.org

Abstract: Mechatronic systems have the advantage of being able to make smart decisions in response to what is perceived in the environment. The medical field presents unique challenges for the development of mechatronic devices that can assist in the advancement of more effective and less invasive treatment options. At Western University, significant advances in the design and development of mechatronic devices for surgery and rehabilitation have been achieved. In this presentation, Dr. Trejos will describe some of the undergoing projects at Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics (CSTAR), focused on robotic systems for surgery and surgical training, and at the Wearable Biomechatronics Laboratory (WearME lab), related to rehabilitation devices.

Biography: Dr. Trejos is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Biomedical Engineering program at the Western University and an Associate Scientist at Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics, Lawson Health Research Institute. She received her B.Sc. degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Costa Rica in 1997, her M.A.Sc. degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of British Columbia in 2000 and her Ph.D. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Western in 2012. From 2000 to 2003 she worked as an Applications Engineer for Progressive Moulded Products in Concord, Ontario. Since 2004, she has been working on the design, development and testing of medical mechatronic systems. Her research is focused towards evaluating how novel mechatronic devices can improve patient care during surgery, therapy and rehabilitation. This includes the development of smart devices for minimally invasive surgery and the design of wearable mechatronic braces that can provide improved treatment options for musculoskeletal disorders. Another component of her research entails the development and evaluation of systems for surgical training and motor skills assessment.